}

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

BUH-BYE, BAY CITY ACADEMY? Michigan School Reform Office School Closure List Expected To Include Steven Ingersoll's Consistently Underperforming Bay City Academy!


Bay City Academy, posting test scores in the bottom 5 percent of Michigan schools for two consecutive years, is on the bubble.

Steven Ingersoll's fraud-tainted, perennially low achieving Bay City charter school, appears on the Michigan School Reform office's February 2016 priority schools list. (See graphic below.)

Schools on the priority list are ranked in the bottom 5 percent of schools statewide based on achievement and achievement gaps, according to the Michigan Department of Education. 

The Bay City Academy landed on this list in 2014.

The School Reform Office (SRO) has vowed to shutter any school whose test scores put them in the bottom 5 percent statewide for three straight years. The public won’t know how many schools have met that threshold until later this fall, when scores from the last two rounds of state exams are released. 

The SRO plans to tell schools whether they're on the closure list by the end of 2016. 

Governor Rick Snyder seized control of the SRO last year from the Michigan Department of Education, transferring the reform office to a state office directly under his control: the Department of Technology, Management and Budget. And although under the Department of Education, the SRO had the power to close schools, it had never done so. 

Snyder cited that sorry-ass record when he seized control of the office.

However, there's an escape clause built into the effort, an "unreasonable hardship" exemption that would exempt schools meeting the closure criteria to stay open because the SRO decides shutting them down would leave their students without access to a better schools. 

In some parts of Michigan, closing a low-performing school might require students to travel far distances. In other neighborhoods, students might have another option nearby — but those schools might not be better. In either case, the School Reform Office has given itself the option not to pursue closure.

It appears that escape clause may not save the Bay City Academy from closure next year.

February 2016 Michigan Priority School list excerpt

Gary Naeyaert, executive director of the Great Lakes Education Project, a charter school advocacy group, said the state's decision to close chronically failing schools is long overdue. "There seems to be no level of failure that was low enough to spark state action," he said. 

Naeyaert pushed back on the assertion that closing failing schools will do little good if high-quality options aren't available. "Just because you have to leave a terrible school to go to a less than average school, that's still progress," he said. 

Bay City Academy operates out of two buildings in Bay City: the Farragut School and the Madison Arts building, 400 N. Madison Avenue. It closed its Old Y campus, 111 N. Madison Avenue, following a steep drop in student population. 

In addition, the Bay City Academy includes a Mancelona campus, the North Central Academy.

In March 2014, the school's Board of Education removed Ingersoll as its president of educational services, pointing to low academic performance and saying the school needed an administrator whose full-time job is to oversee the school's day-to-day operations. The school measured significantly below state average in all 18 grades and subjects, ranging from math to science, to writing, on the 2013 Michigan Educational Assessment Program standardized test. 

The Bay City Academy was first listed as a priority school by the Michigan Department of Education, meaning it ranks in the bottom 5 percent of the state's top-to-bottom rankings list based on 2013-2014 school data. 

In April 2014, Steven Ingersoll was charged with federal fraud and tax evasion offenses. 

Shortly before Ingersoll's indictment was unsealed, the Bay City Academy board, headed by Milford resident and longtime Ingersoll crony, Craig Johnston, made a big show of shitcanning the charter school's founder and president of educational services.

Claiming disappointment of low academic performance at the Bay City Academy, Johnston (presumably with a straight face) said Ingersoll was removed because the school needed an administrator whose full-time job is to oversee the school's day-to-day operations.

So, just four days after former Grand Traverse Academy board president and covert Ingersoll business partner Mark Noss assumed management control of the school on March 19, 2014, the Bay City Academy board appointed Noss' fortunate son-in-law and Traverse City resident, Brian Lynch, as its new superintendent and president of educational services.

Will the circle be unbroken? Bye and bye Lord, bye and bye.

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

AND HITLER LOVED HIS DOG: Record-Eagle Publishes Insane "Ingersoll Isn't All Bad" Twaddle As "Letter To Editor"; Piece Ostensibly Written By Ingersoll Neighbor, Steven Ingersoll Pulls The Strings! "Drug Houses" Comments Appeared In Formerly-Secret Ingersoll/Harger Emails!

Put on your tin foil hats, Miss Fortune has another conspiracy!

Convicted felon and notorious charter cheater Steven Ingersoll appears to have been the "ghost writer" behind a well-timed "letter to the editor".



The weak-kneed Record-Eagle, lacking the pugilistic punch of its former Executive Editor Mike Tyree, today published the letter titled “Ingersoll isn’t all bad”.

Yeah, and Hitler loved his dog!

With Ingersoll's case on summer hiatus (no, that's not a dirty word!), I supposed the remaining few in charge at the TC fish wrapper collectively decided a little advertorial might spice up the waning days of summer. 

I mean, they'll have to wait until next summer to write about the two-headed goat exhibition at the Northwestern Michigan Fair.

Here's the letter, as published in both the online and print versions of the Record-Eagle's August 17, 2016 edition, along with my references to the manipulative hands of Steven Ingersoll (who clearly dictated the components of this letter just like he did to Mark Noss, Brad Habermehl and Bruce Harger when the three dutifully wrote letters to the Michigan Board of Optometry):

Oppression doesn’t happen only to the poor — and Steven Ingersoll is a prime example. 

What is Ingersoll’s offense that has made him so viciously pursued by the IRS? 

Based on his insights into sight and reading, Ingersoll: 

■ founded Grand Traverse Academy catering to learning disabled students 
■ grew this school from elementary to K-12
■ assigned classes based on developmental skills 
■ attempted to repeat GTA success with a duplicate charter school in Bay City 
■ expanded his vision by purchasing drug houses to improve the city center — to be rehabbed by students mentored by non-union tradesmen. 

Yet Ingersoll is a stereotypical visionary — so devoted to his goals that when his accountant died, he unwittingly neglected essential bookkeeping documentation. 

Normally this situation would have brought auditors and fines, but instead a witch hunt was unleashed that subjected him to public humiliation and financial destruction. 

There are logical conclusions about organizations that benefit from Ingersoll being taken down, but the issue at hand is about releasing the oppressed from a false narrative. 

I for one say, “Hang in there Dr. Ingersoll. I support your vision to make our communities better educated. I grieve over this unjust IRS assault and await a reasonable decision by Judge Ludington.” 

Ack, ack! Pffft!

A witch hunt? 

It's been a few years since I first read Arthur Miller's play, The Crucible, and having witnessed much of the trial I can't remember anyone wearing a black, pointy hat! (Well, maybe one person.)

And although the letter is credited to Ingersoll's neighbor, Susan Bonner, it's crystal clear that Steven Ingersoll had an outsized influence on its content.

False narrative? 

It depends on who's doing the "narrating"! 
Let's break this crazy thing down, point by point. 

Oppression doesn’t happen only to the poor — and Steven Ingersoll is a prime example.

Lord Pretentious
Yeah, Ingersoll's just-below-the-skin persecution complex, on display back on March 17, 2014 just two days before Lord Pretentious ceded control of his criminal enterprise to crony/toady Mark Noss, rears its ugly head again when Ingersoll gallingly compares himself to the poor, while shrewdly sliding in a humblebrag about his supposed wealth. 

After all, until he and his wife Deborah stiffed criminal law firm Clark Hill out of $360,371.81, the duo had forked over roughly $154,000 in legal fee payments between October 2013 and early March 2015.

Yeah, he's rich, bitch!

I don't know many so-called oppressed people who can afford a team of lawyers, (at least) two homes and have $1,717 available in the sofa cushions to file a bankruptcy petition for the Webster House B&B in a move to halt Clark Hill's fee non-payment lawsuit! 

In a stall tactic that can only be termed a desperation move, Steven Ingersoll filed a corporation Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition on behalf of his Webster House B&B, LLC on January 6, 2016, seeking to keep Martin Crandall and law firm Clark Hill PLC at bay. Claiming estimated assets of less than $500,000, Ingersoll's bankruptcy form stated his Webster House B&B had liabilities between $500,000 and a cool $1,000,000. 

However, Ingersoll's Webster House bankruptcy petition was dismissed on January 25, 2016 for "failure to file documents" including the B&B's cash flow statement and his income tax return -- you know, little stuff like that! 

What is Ingersoll’s offense that has made him so viciously pursued by the IRS?

Wait, is that a joke or a rhetorical question?

Ingersoll, an unindicted co-conspirator in the Roy Bradley asbestos case, first hired a defense attorney in July 2012! He was indicted in April 2014.

Vicious? 

Nah! Plodding is more like it.

Based on his insights into sight and reading, Ingersoll: 
■ founded Grand Traverse Academy catering to learning disabled students 
■ grew this school from elementary to K-12 
■ assigned classes based on developmental skills 
■ attempted to repeat GTA success with a duplicate charter school in Bay City 
■ expanded his vision by purchasing drug houses to improve the city center — to be rehabbed by students mentored by non-union tradesmen.

I suppose the writer is channeling her muse, Steven Ingersoll, in this list of solo accomplishments I like to call the "I did it my way" section. 

Let me call your attention to an August 2, 2010 story that appeared in the Bay City Times. 

In it, Ingersoll lets his mask slip: “I don’t believe in the stock market nearly as much as I believe in Bay City’s architecture,” he said. “Bay City needs to reposition its architecture and if they do that, they will benefit greatly, financially.” Ingersoll envisions the next generation of workers coming to the area for alternative energy jobs settling in Bay City — and he hopes to have the homes and activities ready for them. “What are they going to choose? Midland is relatively sterile and Saginaw is dead,” he said.

The story goes on to feature another convicted felon, Ingersoll's favorite hack builder, Roy C. Bradley, Sr.:
THE BCA 'HOOD', drug houses in red
Working with Bay City builder Roy Bradley, volunteers are helping to fix up homes and other buildings on the East Side to help renovate neighborhoods. Currently, the group is re-roofing, painting and building a pavilion at Mount Herman Church on Monroe Avenue, as well as painting and building a porch on a home near Birney Park. “We’re going to try to help him however we can,” said Bradley, whose company, Lasting Impressions, also renovates the homes Ingersoll has purchased. “He’s doing what needs to be done, especially cleaning that neighborhood up.” 

And I'd be remiss if I didn't call your attention to those students mentored by "non-union tradesmen", revealed during the trial as exploited, off-the-books cash workers recruited primarily from local homeless shelters. 

Hard to keep an employee when you work him 60 hours a week for $250.

However, one of those workers was handsomely rewarded by Ingersoll after successfully ducking a federal subpoena with the sneaky assistance of Roy Bradley.

Regular readers of this blog will likely remember Kyle "Peanut" Andrezjewski. For those new to the circus, an affidavit filed March 31, 2015 by an IRS agent in Steven Ingersoll's federal fraud case revealed that a quit claim deed was filed on March 26, 2015 with the Bay County Register of Deeds transferring 111 N. Monroe in Bay City from Steven Ingersoll’s Arts District LLC to Kyle Andrezjewski—for the consideration of one dollar! 

Bay County court records show three bench warrants were filed against Andrezjewski in early April for several traffic-related offenses. In the interim, Andrezjewski has reportedly been seen at Roy Bradley's Thunder Cycle shop on Columbus Avenue in Bay City.

Yet Ingersoll is a stereotypical visionary — so devoted to his goals that when his accountant died, he unwittingly neglected essential bookkeeping documentation. Normally this situation would have brought auditors and fines, but instead a witch hunt was unleashed that subjected him to public humiliation and financial destruction.

This hyper-capable guy who, in the words of former Grand Traverse Academy board president Brad Habermehl, "single handedly built Grand Traverse Academy Charter School", was so bewildered by bookkeeping that he lost his shit and couldn't handle basic business documentation?

I gotta call bullshit on this one.

So tell me, why then did the Grand Traverse Academy pay Ingersoll a $1,098,537 management fee in FYE June 2011, one year after Kundinger's untimely August 20, 2010 death? 

Bewildered by bookkeeping, but still able to pay himself nearly 13% of the Grand Traverse Academy's annual revenue!


Anybody? 

There's more!

Yet Ingersoll is a stereotypical visionary — so devoted to his goals that when his accountant died, he unwittingly neglected essential bookkeeping documentation. Normally this situation would have brought auditors and fines, but instead a witch hunt was unleashed that subjected him to public humiliation and financial destruction.

Oh, baby...more of the same crap Ingersoll tried back in 2014!

Court documents filed on September 12, 2014 included the following bizarre assertion: 
"Dr. Steven Ingersoll has made powerful and determined political enemies with his vision for reforming Michigan’s failing public school system through establishment of innovative, privately run charter schools. These political enemies have strong financial and political interests in undermining the charter schools established by Dr. Ingersoll, and stand to benefit from discrediting all of Dr. Ingersoll’s work."

Of course, this conspiracy theory never advanced beyond the court filing!

But you have to love the neo-Jungian typology: Ingersoll portrayed as a stereotypical visionary. 

Swiss psychologist Carl Gustav Jung used the concept of archetype in his theory of the human psyche. He believed that universal, mythic characters—archetypes—reside within the collective unconscious of people the world over. Archetypes represent fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolved; consequentially, they evoke deep emotions.

And there's one that fits Ingersoll to a "t": the Ruler. 

Check it out:

Motto: Power isn't everything, it's the only thing. 
Core desire: control 
Goal: create a prosperous, successful family or community Strategy: exercise power 
Greatest fear: chaos, being overthrown 
Weakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegate 
Talent: responsibility, leadership 
The Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator. 

And finally, this gem: 
There are logical conclusions about organizations that benefit from Ingersoll being taken down, but the issue at hand is about releasing the oppressed from a false narrative. I for one say, “Hang in there Dr. Ingersoll. I support your vision to make our communities better educated. I grieve over this unjust IRS assault and await a reasonable decision by Judge Ludington.”

Taken down? Releasing the oppressed from a false narrative?

The only thing I've ever seen "taken down" is one of Ingersoll's vaunted "renovated" homes after it was torched in early 2014.

Four-alarm bullshit? 

Sure looks like it to me!

Oily rags were allegedly used to torch Ingersoll's 616 N. Grant Street dream house, which was finally torn down (using federal blight-buster funds) in June 2016.

All that's left is a hole in the ground — smoke gets in your...eyes, or wherever.


616 N. Grant Street, 2010


616 N. Grant Street, June 2016