}

Sunday, February 28, 2016

WHAT IS IVL...EXACTLY? Here's An Explanation, Ripped From The Pages Of The Official 'Integrated Visual Learning Procedures' Manual!

IVL Copyright, co-owned by Mark ("no business relationship
with Dr. Ingersoll at the present time") Noss & Steven Ingersoll

“Welcome to Integrated Visual Learning (IVL), a new and exciting optometric-based vision learning process that combines proven vision therapy techniques with integrated cognitive, sensory, and motor skill activities. The material is in the manual is full of novel ideas and exercises. The chapters which follow contain background information on human vision, memory and cognition, vision screening, IVL instruction design, IVL instruction execution, and how to change instruction plans to react to performance variations. The IVL process is designed to change peoples’ lives. The impact of successful IVL treatment is dramatic in the lives of children and families you will be treating. Some of the children you will deal with may have already experienced the stunting effects of psychoactive drugs such as Ritalin. Vision therapy techniques have been practiced since the late 19th century. The objectives of vision therapy have been to improve vision and attempt to improve academic performance. 

The history and practice of vision therapy reveals that the results of therapy have been somewhat inconsistent and unpredictable. Although the immediate corrective effects of vision therapy may have been very positive, one child completing a course of traditional vision therapy treatment becomes an effective learner, while another appears to make equal progress but is never able to learn to read effectively and continued to exhibit low levels of achievement or unacceptable behavior. Dr. Steven J. Ingersoll, of Bay City, Michigan, has developed a systematic treatment process. This process not only treats vision inaccuracies, but through the use of multiple levels of motor skill, sensory, and cognitive activity integration, ensures that accurate eye movements and visual memory processing are rapidly driven to a subconscious level, while at the same time cognitive skills are enhanced. The result is improved visual processing that can be sustained when confronted with multiple task loading that individuals experience in the real world. This unique process is called Integrated Visual Learning (IVL).” 

So, is this process really worth a reported $300,000 annual curriculum fee? Much more from the manual, only from Miss Fortune.  

“One way that I saw Steven Ingersoll manipulated the financial records was by putting a curriculum development line in GTA's budget. Ingersoll made the curriculum development payments to SSM, in addition to the management fee. Steven Ingersoll told me he did this because he did not want to make the management fee too large. Because I was in charge of the curriculum, I know that the school's curriculum was not designed by SSM or Steven Ingersoll.” 

“Based on my familiarity with the people involved, I know that Mark Noss, the owner of the current management company for GTA, and Brad Habermehl, the current GTA board president, have been friends with Ingersoll for many years.” 

“One way that I saw that Steven Ingersoll manipulated the financial records was by putting a curriculum development line in GTA’s budget. Ingersoll made the curriculum development payments to SSM, in addition to the management fee. Steven Ingersoll told me that he did this because he did not want to make the management fee look too large. Because I was in charge of the curriculum, I know that the school’s curriculum was not designed by SSM or Steven Ingersoll. Only a small number of students, approximately 5%, received out-of-classroom instruction based on Steven Ingersoll’s Integrated Visual Learning method. Integrated Visual Learning is a teaching and learning technique rather than a curriculum.” 

 Sworn Affidavit of Kaye Mentley 
October 19, 2015


 

Friday, February 26, 2016

STEVEN INGERSOLL'S MONEY COUCH: “I Rifled Through The Seat Cushions To Get The Money To Do The Things That I Needed To Do.”

“The evidence before the court reveals that Ingersoll could not look to his own assets or those of his entities to fund his grandiose BCA project, so he merely took the money he wanted from the place where he could find it – in the GTA accounts he controlled.”  

-February 19, 2016
 Prosecution Sentencing Brief
UNITED STATES V. INGERSOLL

On February 4, 2016, U. S. District Judge Thomas L. Ludington directed the prosecution and defense to address Steven Ingersoll’s solvency as of August 10, 2010, the date of Ingersoll’s Chemical Bank construction loan application. 

(Ingersoll’s supplemental brief failed to address this issue.)

According to the prosecution, this omission was telling, as no one had better information regarding Steven Ingersoll’s financial situation then Ingersoll himself. 

Ingersoll’s recent sentencing hearing testimony casts some light on the question, however.

Ingersoll essentially acknowledged that he took money from where ever he could find it and moved it to where ever he needed, at will:
  
“When $30,000 was needed for this or that, I looked in my accounts online in the bank and just found the money where it was and spent it on the project, figuring I’d clean it up once I got my accounting in order. That’s what I did. I rifled through the seat cushions essentially to get the money to do the things that I needed to do.” 

Ingersoll further explained: 
  
“This is now ’10 moving up to – and then in ’11, March through June, I utilized the line of credit at Traverse City State Bank and relied on the return from the construction line of credit and then used the return from the construction line of credit to – to the original purpose of the line of credit, which was support of GTA.”

The situation described by Ingersoll during his testimony contrasted with the financial picture he presented to Chemical Bank and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to secure the construction loan for the Bay City Academy church-to-school renovation project. 

In fact, when he testified at his sentencing hearing, Ingersoll appeared to admit that he did not tell Chemical Bank or the USDA that he then owed $3.5 million to the Grand Traverse Academy, although he realized that that obligation would adversely affect his net worth. 

As the prosecution asserted in its February 19, 2016 supplemental sentencing brief, there are compelling reasons to find that Ingersoll testified falsely when he claimed that the seed money for his Bay City Academy project came from the million dollar Traverse City State Bank line of credit rather than from Grand Traverse Academy funds. 

Nevertheless, the prosecution asserts that evidence before the court revealed that Ingersoll could not look to his own assets or those of his entities to fund his grandiose Bay City Academy project, so he took the money he wanted from the place where he could find it – in the Grand Traverse Academy accounts he controlled. 

Steven Ingersoll lacked the personal financial solvency required to fund the Bay City Academy project but not, according to the prosection, the money to pull it off.

Maybe he did find millions in the seat cushions.

Wanna bet those cushions are stashed away in the Perry House?